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Jordan Neel, MA, NCC

“What do we live for, if not to make life less difficult for each other?” –George Eliot

This quote by George Eliot lies at the foundation of my work as a therapist. It is my life’s passion to help facilitate healing and instill hope. I won’t always have all the answers, but we will work together to help you access the strength and resilience that I believe already lies within you. 

I know all too well that life can be trying. Sometimes we find ourselves lost, scared, stuck, sad, angry and/or confused. Maybe you have recently experienced a significant life event that has led to these feelings, or maybe you’ve found yourself here without being able to point to a specific cause. In either case, I will provide you with a safe and judgement-free space to discuss and explore whatever it is you’re going through, with the goal of increasing insight and mitigating emotional pain. 

I tailor my work in order to best meet the needs of individuals, couples, and families who are struggling with a variety of issues including but not limited to grief and loss, trauma, depression & anxiety, and major life transitions. Our collaborative work together will help you recognize your own strengths, process deep emotional wounds, and make changes to facilitate living the life you want. 

Grief and Loss

As a result of my own extensive history with loss, I am passionate about assisting others on their journeys with grief. Significant loss can bring up a lot of surprising and confusing emotions and behavioral reactions. I also know that sometimes our healing timeline does not always fit the expectations of others. Long after we get the last casserole or sympathy card, we are still left grappling with enormous pain and the looming question of how to move on in a world without our loved one. You deserve the space and time to heal that you need. Our work together will help you

  • reach acceptance
  • afford you a safe space to feel and process whatever this loss is bringing up for you
  • adjust to new roles you may have taken on as a result of the loss
  • find and maintain a connection with your loved one in a way that does not inhibit your ability to move forward

The word “acceptance” as it relates to grief has always been a tricky one for me. I want to be clear that to me, acceptance does not mean no longer experiencing intense emotions or no longer being impacted by your loss. To me, it is understanding the reality that your relationship to your loved one does not exist as it once did, yet finding a new but meaningful space for them in your life. “Death ends a life, not a relationship” –Tuesdays with Morrie.

The only thing constant is change!

Significant life transitions can be existing and present a lot of new opportunities, but they can also bring up a lot of stress, anxiety, self-doubt or grief for the way things were. Some examples of such transitions might include, going away to college for the first time, the beginning or end of an important relationship, moving to a new city, starting a new job, losing a job; the list goes on and on! Change in our lives can come whether it is expected or not, and in either instance there is often fear and uncertainty that come with it. It is a part of human nature to resist change and stick to what is familiar because familiar is what feels safe. The good news is, you don’t have to go through it alone. Together we can navigate all of the tough emotions that arise when we transition from one chapter of life to another. 

About Me and Education

I have a B.S. in Psychology from the College of Charleston and an M.A in Counseling from Wake Forest University. I hold memberships to the American Counseling Association, Chi Sigma Iota counseling honor society, and have received my credential as a Nationally Certified Counselor from the National Board for Certified Counselors. I work directly under the supervision of Isabel Kirk, LPC.